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To construct a driveway / lay hardstanding

This work may involve two elements, the formation of a new access to the highway and/or construction of a hardstanding on land that you own. A new access will not need planning permission unless:

  • The road is classified road with an A, B or C number. As C road details are not put on road signs or maps, if you live on a busy road in a town or on a country road, check with your council (or the county council if there is one) to confirm whether your road is ā€œCā€ classified if you are in doubt.
  • If your house is modern, the original planning permission may be subject to conditions that prevent the formation of additional vehicle accesses, for highway safety or other reasons. You should check this with your council.
  • If the new access is to serve something that itself needs planning permission (such as new house or a large extension to an existing house), the access will need to be included in the planning application for the other works.

Any work on land that you do not own, such as lowering the kerb, will need approval from the highway authority (this is separate to the possible need for planning permission).

Constructing, enlarging or replacing a hardstanding such as a driveway, parking area or garden path on your own land does not require planning permission unless:

  • The hardstanding would lie between your house and a highway, and is more than 5 square metres in area. Planning permission will be required in this case unless the hardstanding is porous so water drains through it or provision is made for all surface water from it to drain into your property.
  • If your house is modern, the original planning permission may be subject to conditions that prevent the formation of additional hardstanding, for highway safety or other reasons. You should check this with your council.
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